Monthly Wrap Up: November 2013

Monthly Wrap Up

 

Books I reviewed in November:
(Links take you to my reviews)

Crash into You (Pushing the Limits, #3)

Favourite Book Read in November 2013: Crash Into You (Pushing the Limits #3) by Katie McGarry

Fall For You by Cecilia Grey (Rating: 3.5/5)
Unchosen by Michele Vail (Rating: 3/5)
Love and Relativity by Rachael Wade (Rating: 4/5)
The Isobel Journal by Isobel Harrop (Rating: 4/5)
So Into You by Cecilia Grey (Rating: 3.5/5)
Diamonds are a Teen’s Best Friend by Allison Rushby (Rating: 3.5/5)
The Disgrace of Kitty Grey by Mary Hooper (Rating: 2/5)
Game Plan by Natalie Corbett Sampson (Rating: 4/5)
Break It Up by EM Tippets (Rating: 4/5)
Crash Into You by Katie McGarry (Rating: 4.5/5)
Sia by Josh Grayson (Rating: 3/5)
Wild Awake by Hilary T. Smith (Rating: 4.5/5)

 

Also in November:

 

What’s Coming Up on the Blog in December?

I’m pretty excited about some of the books I’m reviewing in December. Pawn by Aimee Carter is the first in a new dystopian society. It’s got a different social class system, interesting technology and some great characters. On the 10th I’m taking part in the Amberlin Kwaymullina blog tour – The Tribe series looks interesting. I’ve been excited about Amberlin’s books since Mandee from VeganYANerds gave The Interrogation of Ashala Wolf five stars. I’m also taking part in the Captivate by Vanessa Garden blog tour (Friday the 13th is my stop) which is exciting. I love books about mermaids and the fact that Vanessa Garden is an Australian only makes me more excited! I’ll also be reviewing All Our Yesterdays by Cristin Terrill which is an amazing thriller involving time travel.

That’s just the first two weeks and it’s looking like December is going to be a fantastic month blog wise! I’m going to Tasmania at the end of the month – which I am so excited for. I’ve never been before and can’t wait to see all the Apple Isle has to offer! I bought a copy of The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings and plan on taking them with me on my holiday – I’m finally going to read these classic books that I’ve heard so much about.

 

 

Book Review: Wild Awake by Hilary T. Smith

Wild Awake

Title: Wild Awake
Author: Hilary T. Smith
Genre: Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, Young Adult, Music, Romance, 
Publisher: Hardie Grant Egmont
Publication Date: October 1st, 2013
Pages: 375
Rating: 4.5 stars

Synopsis (from goodreads):
Things you earnestly believe will happen while your parents are away:

1. You will remember to water the azaleas.
2. You will take detailed, accurate messages.
3. You will call your older brother, Denny, if even the slightest thing goes wrong.
4. You and your best friend/bandmate Lukas will win Battle of the Bands.
5. Amid the thrill of victory, Lukas will finally realize you are the girl of his dreams.

Things that actually happen:

1. A stranger calls who says he knew your sister.
2. He says he has her stuff.
3. What stuff? Her stuff.
4. You tell him your parents won’t be able to—
5. Sukey died five years ago; can’t he—
6. You pick up a pen.
7. You scribble down the address.
8. You get on your bike and go.
9. Things . . . get a little crazy after that.*
*also, you fall in love, but not with Lukas.

Both exhilarating and wrenching, Hilary T. Smith’s debut novel captures the messy glory of being alive, as seventeen-year-old Kiri Byrd discovers love, loss, chaos, and murder woven into a summer of music, madness, piercing heartbreak, and intoxicating joy

My Review:

Kiri Byrd is the daughter parents can depend on. To water plants, to practice her piano and not to get into any trouble. And Kiri is fine playing the role because she’s convinced that her perfection is the only way to keep her family together after her older sister, Sukey, died in an accident a few years ago. But a strange phone call one night when her parents are away on a cruise leads to Kiri questioning everything she believes to be true.

“It’s amazing how quickly the things you thought would make you happy seem small once you stumble on something true.” 

This book is both beautiful and bizarre. Kiri is in the midst of discovering things about Sukey, her parents and herself that she never even considered. It’s an emotional story with Kiri falling apart. Her sister may not have been the role model Kiri had on a pedestal and her parents dismissal of all thing Sukey may not have been the most healthy thing to do. Kiri is locked in a world where she lives in denial. Watering the azaleas and perfecting complicated piano pieces is the way she is holding things together. But when she finds out there’s more to Sukey’s death than she ever considered, Kiri is thrown – especially considering her brother and parents knew the truth all along. Kiri tries to hold on to the perfect life she’s living whilst at the same time starts to resent it. She’s beautiful in her confusion and reading her was a pleasure. Her awkwardness regarding love and sex was endearing to read and her passion – albeit slightly fanatical – for music was a joy.

And then there’s Skunk. Have you ever heard a more attractive name for the hero of a story? Probably not. Skunk is one of those characters that I adored from the first time Kiri met him.
“He’s huge. Hagridesque. A bulldozer crossed with a  gorilla.”

Romantic, right? His relationship with Kiri is one based on friendship first and contrasts perfectly with the relationship Kiri has with bandmate Lukas. Both boys couldn’t be more different and they do a great job of representing Kiri’s perfect past and confused present.

I loved the writing in this novel. If I were to underline my favourite lines most of the book would be marked. Kiri’s spiral downwards was oddly wonderful to read – one of those things that feel like they should be entirely uncomfortable were written in a way that made me want to read more and anticipate how Kiri would react to the next bombshell in her life. Her relationships with everyone are declining and it’s awkward yet enticing.

The ending wasn’t quite what I was expecting but I felt it was perfectly fitting for both the plot and the characters. I wasn’t expecting to like this book as much as I did – the recreational drug use on page 1 nearly turned me off but this is so much more than a teenage stoner story. It’s an emotional and lovely debut novel with amazingly flawed characters and some beautiful prose. I adored this book and will definitely be looking out for more books by Hilary T. Smith.

Favourite Quotes:

“His smile is a jar full of fireflies”

“The wired feeling that started when I left my house has grown into a thrumming, crackling, electrical field. I want to kiss Lukas. I want to dance down the street. There’s a reason people get drunk after funerals, and I suddenly know what it is: the flip side of sadness is a dark, devouring joy, a life that demands to be fed.”

“I want to kiss you,” I say, “but I seem to be holding this cat.”
Skunk lifts his hand and touches it to the side of my face. His fingers are warm from carrying the hot skillet to the table. He regards me very seriously, and for a moment I wonder if he’s about to tell me we should Focus on Bicycle Repair. Instead he just looks at me for a very long time.
“You’re beautiful,” says Skunk, “and completely batshit.” 

Thanks to Hardie Grant Egmont for the review copy.

Purchase the novel from:

Amazon | Booktopia | Book Depository | Book World